Two big features:

So how does zero downtime actually work in production? Seroter explained that, for example, an organization could deploy an application (v1) with Cloud Foundry and then perhaps a second app (v2). After the v2 application is deployed, an administrator could then just simply switch the network route to enable the new version. The same basic method is now being scaled in an automated approach.

“Let’s say I have five instances of my app and when I deploy the next version, under zero downtime deploy, as each instance of that app comes up in that same bucket, one of the old one comes out,” Seroter said. “I always have five running and I may be in a state where both versions are serving traffic, but at no point is there any disruption because in that same sort of app container, across all the different VMs [virtual machines] and Cloud Foundry, the application instances are swapping out for each other automatically.”

And,

“What the scanner does for the customers is basically ensure that the configuration of the OS matches the best practice recommendations for a cloud-native deployment,” John Field, security architect at Pivotal, told eWEEK. www.eweek.com/cloud/piv…